Category Archives: Cycling Events & News

The Contender Camp – Season Six

The Contender Camp

It’s that time of year again. Leaves are falling, daylight is dwindling, jackets are resurfacing and the threat of El Nino looms! …What we’re trying to say is that Contender Camp just around the corner! We are doing online registration again this year. If any participants are interested in paying for all three blocks in advance, we’d like to extend them a special offer by including a follow-up lactate test free of charge. Once you have registered online, your spot is reserved.

To sign up for Block I & your initial lactate test, please click HERE.

To take advantage of the camp special (3 blocks & 2 lactate tests), please click HERE.

Here is the information for this year’s camp. Already in our sixth season, we’re taking the classes to the next level! Plus we have some exciting changes that are going to make this year’s Camp the best yet. The Contender Camp has been known to…

  • turn you into lean, mean, pedaling machines just in time for spring riding
  • create a new and improved passion for cycling
  • forge friendships that last lifetimes (or until the next group-ride-grudge-match up Emigration)

It’s a little thing we like to call The Contender Consortium. The brain trust of Ryan and Alison’s boundless cycling and training, Dr. Eric Taylor and Blake’s knowledge and impressive backgrounds in sports physiology as well as this year’s addition of pro-cyclist Jeff Louder’s input and invaluable experience will be coming together to make sure this year’s classes are the best yet.

How Does Our Class Work?

We take the latest science-based training principles, combine them with our lactate testing and state-of-the-art CompuTrainer facility for catered training parameters and accurate measurements of your cadence and power output. This is essential to get maximum results from your training time in class. This scientific approach creates the ideal formula necessary to make the greatest improvements in our fitness. Our goal is to make sure you’re not just simply fit and ready for spring riding but to make sure that the fitness, knowledge and skills you’ve gained forge a more confident and better performing rider. Split into three 6-week training ‘blocks’ or phases, each block uses specific training principles which will challenge Camp participants and help us see improvements along the way ultimately motivating us to become a better cyclist. Plus our expert staff and their legendary choice of playlist keeps you motivated and (possibly) fist pumping for the entire 90 minute workout.

And What About These New Features?

  • FLAT SCREEN FANTASTIC – We’re adding some flat screens to our training center for an easier way to keep track of the progression of the workout. Plus a little extra motivation is added while you pedal with some choice race clips curated by our staff
  • TRAINING CENTER – We’ve put together a small training center focused on fundamental exercises and recovery modalities designed to strengthen and speed recovery of functional muscles that cyclist tend to overlook. More details to come soon!
  • EXPANDED SATURDAY OPTIONS – We are a bike shop for the people. And what did the people ask? They asked for more weekend options for a Saturday “bonus” class. If you miss one of your workouts during the week or want to squeeze in one more ride, we’ll offer more chances on Saturday. As always the trainer room is open during the shop’s business hours for use by all Camp participants.

But let’s not forget one of the best reasons to sign up for the class – the chance to meet cyclists who are motivated to stay fit, to work hard and to have fun during those chilly winter months.

CLASS SCHEDULE
M/W Morning: 6:00 AM – 7:30 AM
M/W Evening: 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
T/TH Early Morning: 5:15 AM – 6:45 AM (SOLD OUT)
T/TH Late Morning: 9:00 AM – 10:30 AM
T/TH Late Afternoon: 4:15 PM – 5:45 PM
T/TH Evening: 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM (SOLD OUT)

BLOCKS OF TRAINING
BLOCK I: MON, NOV 3 – THU, DEC 16 (THANKSGIVING BREAK – NOV 26 & 27)
BLOCK II: WED, DEC 17 – THU, FEB 7 (HOLIDAY BREAK – DEC 24 through JAN 4)
BLOCK III: MON, FEB 9 – THU, MAR 19

PRICES
INDIVIDUAL 6 WEEK BLOCKS: $280.00
INITIAL LACTATE TEST: $100.00
FOLLOW-UP LACTATE TESTS (if desired to reestablish training zones): $100.00
CAMP SPECIAL: $940 (all three blocks and two lactate tests included)

Blake Vatne will again be doing all of the lactate testing at Contender Bicycles. For your initial testing, please feel free to set up a time with him during the month of October before classes begin. Please note that although retesting lactate levels at some point halfway through the camp is optional, we recommend reestablishing your training values in order to maximize your gains and foster continual growth throughout the classes as you get stronger and stronger on the bike! For additional information, please feel free to contact our shop (801.364.0344) or email Blake at blake@contenderbicycles.com. If you are interested in a class that is full, please email Blake so he can put you on a cancellation list.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF TRAINING WITH A COMPUTRAINER?
First, you are using your own bike on a Computrainer allows you to train indoors in the same position you use out on the open road. So for each ride you don’t have to adapt to going back and forth between a stationary bike and your personal bike. Second, using a Computrainer allows you to ride at precise intensities prescribed in accordance with the values specific to your ability. Once you set a specific workload or wattage, the Computrainer instantly adjusts to keep your workload steady regardless of your cadence. In addition, there is only a little flywheel to help “carry you through” the effort. In other words, there is no coasting on a Computrainer. It all adds up to making the most of your training time and turns every RPM into an investment in your fitness!

WHY TRAIN BASED OFF OF LACTATE THRESHOLD VALUES?

WHAT IS LACTATE?
For half a century, lactic acid has been considered the cause of muscle fatigue and burning sensation during high intensity exercise. In the body, lactic acid is present in very small amounts even in resting condition. Most of it is dissociated as lactate. The most recent theory on lactate metabolism and exercise is that lactate is a great way for the body to “move” energy between cells. We also know that lactate doesn’t cause fatigue but correlates to it. Lactate can also be used as an energy source. Studies show that without lactate recycling we would need to carry a 150 lb backpack of ATP to complete a marathon. The rate of production and reutilization of lactate stays equal up to the individual reaching their lactate threshold. Lactate threshold is the point where the rate of production exceeds the rate of reutilization of lactate. After this point, excessive lactate begins to build lowering blood pH and resulting in muscular fatigue.

WHY LACTATE TESTING?
Lactate testing allows you to see exactly how the body is responding to the muscular stress you apply. Using a hand held blood lactate analyzer along with power output data from the Computrainer, your training zones can be established to maximize the effectiveness of the training. In other words, your lactate values and your power levels help map the zones that will stimulate the greatest fitness gains.

HOW IS A LACTATE TEST PERFORMED?
A lactate test is performed using a hand held lactate analyzer, heart rate monitor, and a Computrainer displaying power output. When a test is performed there is a standard warm up of 10-15 minutes. This warm up increases your muscles temperature allowing the reactions for energy production to be faster and more efficient. After starting the test at a predetermined workload, intensity is increased every three minutes until you go just beyond OBLA (on set of blood lactate utilization). During each phase of the test, heart rate, perceived exertion and blood lactate level are taken along with current power output. Normally this takes around 15 -20 minutes.

HOW ARE BLOOD LACTATE LEVELS MEASURED?
Using a hand held analyzer, blood lactate levels are determined using a pen-point sized blood sample on a disposable chip. The small drop of blood is taken from the earlobe using a sterile, disposable lance. Once testing is complete, the lactate analyzer readings and power output levels are imported into a graph. This graph helps to understand how you body responds to different levels of work and aids in determining your “intensity zones”. These zones are much more effective to use over heart rate zones based on formulas related to age or maximum heart rates.

WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF POWER BASED ZONES OVER HEART RATE TRAINING?
1. Heart rate changes dramatically with temperature.
2. Heart rate is affected by diet and hydration levels.
3. Heart rate lags increases or decreases in the actual workload.
4. Heart rate does not accurately allow you to see when you are riding in an anaerobic state. In short, the combination of power and heart rate provide a clearer picture of how your body responds to your effort.

CYCLING CAMP STAFF
Our cycling camp staff brings a unique approach to indoor cycling training. With Ryan and Dr. Eric Taylor having worked closely together to develop our program, our staff shares the same theories and practical approach to training. We believe in using a science-based approach to make you a better athlete.

ERIC TAYLOR
Eric has extensive experience as a physiologist, coach, and athlete. Eric has a PhD in physiology, completed a postdoctoral fellowship in muscle metabolism and exercise physiology at Harvard Medical School, and is a currently a professor in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Iowa. His research on mitochondrial metabolism was recently published in the prestigious journal Science. Eric has broad coaching experience with all levels of runners and cyclists. Eric competed as a track athlete for Brigham Young University, running the 800 and 1500 meters. He currently competes as a Category 3 road cyclist and also races cyclocross. Although Eric now calls Iowa home, expect to see him from time to time out on the Utah roads.

RYAN LITTLEFIELD
Ryan brings to the camp over twenty years of experience in the bicycle industry. Born and raised in Salt Lake City, Ryan started bike racing and working in the industry at the age of sixteen. As a cyclist, he competed as a top regional rider with success on a national level both as a rider and a manager. Ryan helped develop and manage the most successful team to have ever come out of Utah. What started as a team of up-and-coming local riders turned into a launching pad for several of today’s top American professionals including Dave Zabriskie. With an honors business marketing degree from the University of Utah and over twenty years of bicycle industry experience, Ryan has built Contender Bicycles into what it is today.

JEFF LOUDER
Jeff’s decision to retire from professional cycling at the end of the 2014 season is a loss to his team, UnitedHealthcare, but we couldn’t be happier because it means that he has time start working with us! Originally from Salt Lake City, Louder was the 2008 winner of the Tour of Utah. He’s raced for over 15 years as a pro and has taken part in the 2010 Giro d’Italia, and has won stages at the Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah (2010), The Tour of Qinghai Lake (2004), Redlands Bicycle Classic, Tour of Connecticut (2004), and has taken third place in US Nationals. Louder has also been a podium finisher at several international stage races, including the Tour de Beauce where he finished third in 2005 and the Tour of Qinghai Lake in China where he finished third in 2004.

BLAKE VATNE
Drawn away from his native Minnesota by Utah’s big mountains and deep winter powder, Blake chose the University of Utah to earn a BS in Exercise Physiology. Blake has worked at Contender Bicycles throughout college. Since graduating in the spring 2010, Blake has taken on an integral role in organizing and managing the Contender Camp throughout the fall, winter and early spring months. Besides being a great skier, Blake is an equally enthusiastic cyclist who enjoys riding on both the road and mountain bike. Blake is also very interested and knowledgeable about nutrition, so we at the shop often seek out Blake’s advice when choosing nutritional products.

ALISON LITTLEFIELD
Alison gradually fell into her role at Contender Bicycles. Shortly after starting to race on the road, she met Ryan on the way out to the local criterium series. After they married, Alison continued to race bicycles and establish her career as an engineer. Experiencing some success racing, Alison decided to put her career on hold and race bicycles full-time. However, a severe spinal injury resulted in multiple surgeries which derailed her plans in cycling. In between surgeries and during recovery, Alison started to work at the shop. Over the years, her role has steadily grown to where she is now an integral part of Contender Bicycles. With her recovery behind her, she still loves to ride and feels lucky to still be on the bike.

Contender Bicycles Cyclocross Skills Clinic

 

Thursdays, beginning September 18, 5:30-7:30 pm, thru October 16 (5 weeks total).

Location: Sugarhouse Park, Salt Lake City. 2100 S. 1500 E.
Schedule: Meet at the NW Corner of the Park. See map on Page 2. Barrier Practice for 30-60 minutes, followed by anti-clockwise laps around the park
perimeter.

All-inclusive Fees for the entire 5 weeks:
• USA Cycling License Holders: $20 unlimited pass
• Non-licensed Riders $15 one time + $10 each additional day
• Registration online ONLY. You must register for your first clinic!
https://www.bikereg.com/contender-cyclocross-skills-clinic

Fees partially cover the cost of the permits (USA Cycling and Sugarhouse Park), insurance for all riders ($1/rider/day), and the $10/day/rider one-day license fee for non-licensed riders. Do the math. No extra charges, no refunds, no profit. Licensed Riders must sign in each week, one-day license required each time for non-licensed riders.

Goals: Learn something about cyclocross technique; how to go over barriers, run up hills, and ride a skinny-tired bike off the pavement. Local ‘cross gurus will lead the clinics and distribute nuggets of wisdom. Cyclocross or Mountain Bikes are welcome.

Rules: Bikes are absolutely prohibited off-pavement anytime except during the clinic! Violation will result in us losing use of the Park. This is a promise. Do not ride on the grass except for Thursdays, during the clinic. Clinic participants are expected to police themselves.

Need more information? Email crossdoctor@gmail.com.

Minimizing conflict with other park users. The time of the clinic is one of the
heaviest used times by runners, and runners use the same perimeter trail as for the
cyclocross clinic. We must minimize conflicts with runners . First, the cyclists have to
be aware of the requirement to be good citizens, second, the cyclists will give the right away to runners on the trail.

What does this mean to you, the bike rider? Don’t annoy the runners! If there is some encounter, apologize. Give them a wide berth and politely announce your presence. Don’t ride your bike around Sugarhouse Park outside the clinic times. If you see someone else doing this, explain to them the ramifications of their actions. Conflicts between cyclists and runners could cause us to permanently lose the Park.

2014-08-13 19.09.33

BMC Team Night? More Like BMC Dream Night

Last night we were lucky enough to host the Men’s BMC Pro Cycling Team who had just wrapped up a successful campaign in our very own Tour of Utah. The team was gracious enough to come by, hang out, talk about racing a little bit and answer some questions from their adoring public.

Standing room only last night as Team BMC stopped by Contender HQ.

Standing room only last night as Team BMC stopped by Contender HQ.

Among the BMC attendees was Michael Schär, who not only pulled off an impressive TOU win on Stage 2, a 130 mile suffer-fest that included 10,162 feet of climbing over four KOMs, but who also caught the eye of our favorite new staff member, Katie Houser:

“When he walked in, my jaw pretty much dropped. I was like, who’s that tall drink of water? Then we started talking about our favorite chamois and I knew that was it -he likes chamois, I like chamois, he’s the one.”

- Katie on her run in with BMC greatness and future hubby.

Turns out Katie has a soft spot for tall, slender Swiss men. The fact that he rides a bike is, "just icing on that beefy cake", she said.

Turns out Katie has a soft spot for tall, slender Swiss men. The fact that he rides a bike is, “just icing on that beefy-quaded, handsome cake”, she said.

The team not only spent time answering questions but they also were awesome enough to shake some hands and autograph hats, bottles, jerseys and posters.

 

Peter Stetina chatting with some fans and signing memorabilia last night during our BMC Team Night

Peter Stetina chatting with some fans and signing memorabilia last night during our BMC Team Night

Our Thanks to the BMC riders, Peter Stetina, Michael Schär, Brent Bookwalter, Rick Zabel, Ben Hermans, Yannick Eijssen and Martin Kohler for coming out and saying hi!

Next stop for the team is Colorado for the USA Pro Cycling Challenge

Plenty of BMC schwag kept the kiddos happy

Plenty of BMC schwag kept the kiddos happy

You can check out BMC’s Flickr album from the night HERE

Cycling Crazies and Tour Toes- It’s Tour of Utah Time! (VIDEO)

Cycling fans, let’s get real.  Utah’s roots in bikes and bike racing run deep. So it’s no wonder the Tour of Utah is a big deal a really big deal to all of us crazy cyclists that call Utah home.

I’m here to rally the troops. I’m here to insight a movement of pure cycling super-fan madness. Let’s paint our faces. Let’s lose our voices. Let’s wear weird costumes. Let’s have questionable amounts of our bodies visible in said costumes. Why? because we all know the second best thing to actually riding in a tour is standing on the side of the road with no shirt and a red clown wig ringing a cow bell like the cow has a gun to your head.

I think we’re off to a good start with this: Our good friend Martin Cole decided to show his TOU fever by painting his frickin’ toes!

This is what I'm talking about! Pretty sure where these toes go, the party follows

This is what I’m talking about! Pretty sure where these toes go, the party follows. Well played, Martin.

But I want to see some of this too:

El Diablo would be a solid addition to our TOU

El Diablo would be a solid addition to our TOU

And definitely a bit of all this:

Obviously this needs to happen in the TOU.

Obviously this needs to happen.

Questioning this man's taste? Don't. He's spot on. PHOTO: FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images

Questioning this man’s taste? Don’t. He’s spot on. PHOTO: FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images

 

These young men are a prime example of perfect TOU attire. Well done, little sirs.

These young men are a prime example of perfect TOU attire. Well done, little sirs.

we applaud these gentlemen for their commitment. A prime example that you don't necessarily need to show skin to prove your cycling fandom.  But isn't their a part of you that's thinking this wouldve been funnier if the dude's were shirtless? Yep. Us too.

We applaud these gentlemen for their commitment. A prime example that you don’t necessarily need to show skin to prove your cycling fandom. But isn’t there a part of you that’s thinking this would’ve been funnier if the dude’s were shirtless? Yep. Us too.

Now, we definitely don’t want to see any of this:

 

But hey, if the great Jens Voigt says he loves us, then we know we’re doing something right:

“I’ll never forget my first day in Utah. I was still jetlagged—yes, I am pretty good at that— and on Stage 1 I have to go to the front with Joost Posthuma and a couple of Garmin riders. I still hadn’t adapted to the altitude and finally on the last climb I just blow. I mean it was a spectacular detonation! So there I am dead last going up this climb. I couldn’t even hold the wheels of the sprinters. I just wanted to find a ditch to crash into until an ambulance came and picked me up. But the fans kept yelling, “shut up legs,” and they just cheered me up. So I kept the faith. That is real fan support.” -Jens Voigt in Bicycling Magazine on his experiences in the TOU.

We’ll see the racers up here in Salt Lake this Saturday, August 9th for stage 6, the ‘Queen Stage’ -where the racers will be suffering climbing up Emigration, Big Mountain, Guardsman and then finishing in Snowbird. It’s a little over 12,500 ft of elevation in 107 miles. Which also means it’s a little over ridiculous.

You can get a spectator guide or download the official Tour of Utah mobile app HERE.

And I better not be the only one out there in a speedo.

53_20140727_©BrakeThrough-Media_3S1A1360-659x440

2014 Tour Wrap Up: Nibali Didn’t Crash (But He Also Won)

 

Vincenzo Nibali, stepped down from the podium in front of the Champs-Elysees on Sunday a champion.

He had lead the 2014 Tour for every single stage less two, he’d won four of it’s 21 stages, and his lead of 7-minutes and 37-seconds was the biggest margin of victory held in the Tour since Armstrong’s win (now officially not a win) in 1999. Nibali is also now one of only a handful of riders that has won the Giro, the Vuelta and the Tour –all three of the Grand Tours.

Regardless of all this, some look at Nibali’s win as simply a result of better rider’s bad luck with crashes and injuries early in the Tour.

Bradley Wiggins, who won the Tour in 2012 was passed over by Team Sky because they wanted to focus on Chris Froome, the 2013 Tour winner. When Froome crashed out along with Alberto Contador, it was suggested that Nibali was just the best of what was left in the peloton.

However, even before their unfortunate crashes, Nibali had a two-second lead on Contador and Froome after he won Stage 2. When Froome crashed out in Stage 5, Nibali put more than 2 minutes between himself and Contador. When Contador’s unfortunate crash occurred on a downhill in Stage 10, Nibali went on to win the stage as it climbed to a ridiculously steep mountain finish atop La Planche des Belles Filles. Nibali then went on to win two more mountain stages across the Alps and Pyrenees.

It’s pretty obvious that Nibali didn’t simply ‘slip’ into a spot made empty by the unlucky crashes of some talented riders. The Italian is a true talent himself. Maybe now he’ll get some respect.

AP Photo/Christophe Ena

AP Photo/Christophe Ena

Point is, we’re excited to see him next year. Complementi Vincenzo Nibali!

The Tour’s official website popped out this little video highlight reel of the 2014 Tour. Take a look:


EN – Best of 2014 – After the race by tourdefrance

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Need a New Helmet? Have We Got A Deal For You!

Come in to Contender this Thursday, July 17th from 5pm until 7pm with your old, beat up (or beat down) helmet and get 25% off any Lazer helmet.

Look, we know a few of you have some nappy helmets. This is your chance to turn that embarrassment in to cash!

Our good friends at Lazer are going to be taking all the helmets traded in and completely recycling them.

That’s right! Any helmet that’s cracked, faded, or just ridiculously worn out can be traded in to be recycled and you get 25% off a gorgeously brand new Lazer Helmet.

We have old Lazer favorites like the Genesis and Helium as well as the brand new, super posh Z1

Even if you’re not in the market for a new lid, this is a great way to get rid of an old helmet and make sure it’s recycled.

So go grab your nasty old helmet and come see us this Thursday, from 5PM to 7PM!

contadorcrash

The Tour So Far: Crashes, Casualties, and Unrequited Love (VIDEO)

PHOTO: Christophe Ena/AP

There’s a reason they call a rider’s attempt at the Tour a campaign, it can get bloody.

Already this year the Tour has suffered some heavy casualties. No doubt before the peloton rolls past the Champs-Elysees in a couple weeks, there will be more.

With Mark Cavendish crashing in the first stage, defending champion Chris Froome retiring his campaign during Stage 5 after having three crashes in two days and Alberto Contador out yesterday from a wreck that resulted in a broken tibia, it looks like current race leader, Italy’s Vincenzo Nibali is staring at a very possible Tour de France win.

-If he doesn’t crash or lose some crazy time in the Alp stages ahead.

Nibali’s two-and-a-half minute lead in the GC means a lot of folks are calling the Yellow Jersey his to lose.

Vincenzo Nibali is the current leader of the Tour. Photo: courtesy of London Evening Standard

Vincenzo Nibali is the current leader of the Tour. Photo: Courtesy of London Evening Standard

Since the focus of the Tour so far has been crash after crash after crash, we might as well take a look at some of the Tour’s biggest crashes in the past couple years:

Now, if the Italian does succeed in finishing first in Paris, there are already rumblings that he wouldn’t have really ‘earned’ his championship because of all the mayhem that plagued the first part of the Tour and the key riders that were taken out to let him slip into that yellow jersey a little more easily.

Nibali must be feeling like he gets no respect.

A feeling crystallized when he was denied a kiss by one of the podium girls after winning Stage 2:


Who doesn’t want to kiss an Italian?? Maybe if he wins the Tour she’ll give him a hearty pat on the back.

I guess we’ll see how well Nibali climbs in the Alps.

MartynAshton2

Paralysed Martyn Ashton Inspires Homage (Video)

PHOTO: Courtesy Bike Magazine

Last September, Martyn Ashton, the legendary UK mountain bike trials rider and former World Champion, was finishing work on his second short film of trials style riding on a road bike, Road Bike Party 2 (embedded below), when a fall from a platform ten feet off the ground left him paralyzed from the waist down.

Falling backwards off a platform during a trials demo at the Animal WD40 Action Sports Tour, Ashton was airlifted to a local hospital where he spend the following six weeks recovering from the accident. In the interim, he grabbed some friends to help him finish the stunts in the video, which he edited and released earlier this year.

It’s pretty #$%&ing rad:

It turns out Ashton’s awesome stunts have inspired some folks out there. Especially a dude from Italy named Vittorio Brumotti, a trials star himself, who’s done his best to pay homage to the infamous Ashton by putting together his own little piece of road bike insanity that he just released:

Pretty amazing stuff to be riding around a working quarry, jumping onto bulldozers, and not even having to wear an orange safety vest. Italians are the coolest.

Brumotti is a big fan of Ashton. In fact, Brumotti says that, “Martyn was one of my inspirations and I was a huge fan of everything he did on Road Bike Party. My new film is my dedication to Martyn’s work.”

Brumotti is right to pay the man such high regard. All it takes is one look at Martyn Ashton’s Facebook posts, where he’s currently inspiring folks to try something that gets them out of their comfort zone before July, or even reading over a couple quotes about his accident and how he’s dealt with the aftermath, to realize he’s a particularly rare person. I’ve long held the belief that trials riders have a supreme ability to look at something -whether it’s terrain, an object, or a ridiculously precarious drop- and allow themselves to think positively enough about it that they pluck up some courage and go for it! Where most of us see an absolute no-pass-nightmare and go pedaling in the opposite direction, our heads full of self-doubt and negative talk, trials-minded folk will smile, hop on their bike and give it a shot. How would it be to have that outlook on things? I can’t help but think that attitude is helped Ashton during his recovery from the fall. It seems like it’s continuing to serve him well now with his new endeavors.

No doubt it’s been an adjustment, but judging by the photos of him hitting a velodrome on a hand cycle, swimming, rowing or trying out some canoeing, you can’t really say Ashton has slowed down.

All of us at Contender are huge fans of this guy. We’re excited to see what he does next.

Throwback Thursday – Giovanni Pinarello

In 1951, Giovanni Pinarello was racing in the 34th Giro d’Italia which was won by Rosa Fiorenzo Magni. Giovanni came in last place in the race, which in that time was not a dishonor, instead, a competition to wear the Maglia Nera (Black Jersey) which was awarded to the rider in last place overall. Cyclists would purposely hide out or give themselves flat tires in order to finish last in a stage. While not practiced anymore, this victory was recognized just as much as winning the Giro overall. Upon arriving in Milan on the final day of the race, Giovanni Pinarello rode a “lap of honor” with the winers in the Viogorelli Velodrome.

The photo below is from the Pinarello Family Store in Treviso, Italy. In the store, a quote from Gino Bartali (a good friend of Giovanni) is visible and says: “The Black Jersey of Cycling … but the Pink Jersey of Life.”

The history of Giovanni Pinarello in the Pinarello Family Shop in Treviso.

The history of Giovanni Pinarello in the Pinarello Family Shop in Treviso.