The Pinarello Dogma F Insider's Guide: No Longer Playing By the Numbers

The Pinarello Dogma F Insider's Guide: No Longer Playing By the Numbers

Written by Contender Bicycles, on June 24, 2021

Pinarello didn’t really need to change the Dogma lineup at all. After all, the Dogma F12 is one of our favorite bikes in the world, as it was in many ways our benchmark in handling, ride quality and all-day performance. But of course, Pinarello had to one-up themselves, and thus the new Pinarello Dogma F was born. In some ways, it no longer plays by the numbers; in others, it is classically a Pinarello.

Pinarello Dogma F Disc at Contender BicyclesWhat’s In a Name?

Dogma has seen a number of iterations over the years. It was originally a magnesium bike used largely as Pinarello transitioned from steel and aluminum to carbon race bikes in the early 2000s. A number of iterations of Dogma, from the 60.1 to the F-series of bikes, has allowed Pinarello as a sponsor to have 15 Tour de France wins and 7 of the last 10 wins on the Dogma alone.

Pinarello says that the Dogma name represents dream bikes. Importantly, the Dogma has never been described as an aero bike or a climbing bike. Rather, the Dogma has always been the right road bike for climbing, descending, and everything in between. This means the Dogma delivers it's speed immediately, regardless of where you’re riding. As they said in their presentation, “need a bike to ride roads? Just take a Dogma.”

Pinarello Dogma F Disc at Contender Bicycles climbingThe Bits You Want to Know

Pinarello has always been derided for the relative high weights of their frames, and the Dogma is no exception. Part of this reasoning, Pinarello says, is that low weight doesn’t make a bike good. Shedding grams doesn’t mean the geometry is dialed, nor does it mean there is harmony between every part of the bike. Regardless of whether you believe that or not, the Dogma has always felt like it rode lighter than it was. We expect Dogma F to be no exception here.

Pinarello Dogma F frame detail at contender bicycles

Now that they’ve prefaced that, they were proud to announce that the Dogma F frameset kit - namely, frame/fork/headset/handlebar/seatpost - is lighter. Here are the exact claims:

  • Frame weight is down 9 percent.
  • Fork weight is down 58 grams or about 16 percent lighter.
  • Seatpost and hardware are 52 grams lighter.
  • A new headset is 25 grams lighter.
  • New thru axles save 20 grams each.
  • MOst Talon Ultrafast handlebar saves 40 grams and is 13 percent lighter.

Improvement in stiffness and ride quality of the Pinarello Dogma FOverall, this makes the new Dogma F 265 grams lighter than an equivalent Dogma F12 frame kit. Usually, there are marginal gains to be had - and Pinarello called them as much - but 265 grams lighter is a fairly substantial difference.

Official weight for the new Dogma F Disc is 6.8 kilograms (14.99 lbs) for Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 R9100 and DT Swiss ARC1400 carbon wheels in a size 53cm.

Pinarello claims that they focus on the holistic package of the bike: it's handling, aerodynamics, ride quality over a myriad of road surfaces, and durability over all-out weight. But we’re happy to see that the Dogma F maintains the same stiffness and durability as before.

Pinarello Dogma F Disc at Contender Bicycles seatstay detail

Disc and rim brake models (no, rim brakes aren’t dead!) weigh about the same. But the key differences come in aerodynamics. Pinarello made a big deal of a narrower seattube and seatpost here, updated downtube to improve aerodynamics around water bottles, and improved aerodynamics around the seatstays. Pinarello has used Flatback tube profiles - a Kamm tail tube shaping - for several Dogma models, but the Dogma F sees the tube profile used on the downtube, top tube, and fork blades more than ever. An updated seatstay contributes substantially to a reduced frontal area number as well as a narrower seatpost as allowed by 2021 UCI rules. Here's the nitty gritty:

  • Dogma F rim brake is 3.2 percent more aero than an F12 rim brake.
  • Dogma F Disc is 4.8 percent more aero than F12 Disk.
  • Dogma F Disc is now more aerodynamic than the rim brake model.
  • A claimed 1.3 saved at 40 km/h.
  • A claimed 2.6 watts saved at 50 km/h.

Pinarello is in on the joke, as they themselves call these changes marginal gains. But the Dogma F12 was already one of the most aero road bikes in the pro peloton, so little changes.

Pinarello Dogma F Disc - Ineos Grenadiers Riding at Contender BicyclesThe Bits You Need to Know - Geometry and Frame Details

There are 11 frame sizes available, 16 handlebar options, and two seatpost setback options for a total of 352 options for sizing. It's about as close to custom as it gets. Geometry overall remains about the same as the previous Dogma. Small sizes see a slight reduction in options - there was a lot of overlap on prior Dogma models - but besides that geometry stays largely the same. Not that we’re complaining.

Pinarello Dogma F road bike geometry chart at Contender Bicycles

Overall, the Dogma maintains the formula we know and love. While Pinarello has stuck to offering a max 28c tire clearance, we’ve had regular success fitting slightly wider tires. It is still compatible with the previous-generation Most Talon Ultra Handlebar, any Pinarello TiCR stem, or with an option to run the stem of your choice if you so prefer. An Italian threaded bottom bracket, two-position mounts for the second bottle cage. Pinarello Dogma F in grey silver and Red When Can I Get One?

Now, you’re probably asking, “looks sweet, can I order a Pinarello Dogma F frameset today?” Slow your roll, everyone; the Dogma F and Dogma F Disc  is not yet available. Frames are in pre-order now, so if you want one let us know. We will happily help with a custom build option as well to make sure you build your dream Dogma right from the start.

The Pinarello Dogma road bike has been for many of us the pinnacle of road bikes, and with its lower weight and improved aerodynamics without sacrificing ride quality, we think the Dogma will continue to be a dream bike for many years to come.

Pinarello Dogma F Disc race road bike insider's guide at contender bicycles

Have any questions about the Pinarello Dogma F road bike? Give us a call or send us an email at info@contenderbicycles.com.


27 comments

  • when is the dogma f being updated or replaced and by what?

    eric on

  • Noreen,

    I’ve sent you a message in far greater detail, but the gist of it is that I think you’ll be a-ok here. You might want to consider another 5mm spacer under the stem, but besides that I think you’ll be able to match your fit nicely between the 44cm Dogma F10/F12 and the new Dogma F.

    Feel free to reach out with any questions!

    Alvin - Contender Bicycles on

  • I am a fan of Pinarello since my 2009 Prince. I have since upgraded to dogma but I have alway been a 44cm at 5 foot 4 incles and a very proportionate rider I am perplexed at the new sizing… you mention so many options to dial in but I am worried that the 44 cm (seat was at the absolute position on rails with 90 stem….that the 46.5 is just a bit too long and the 43 is definitely too short at least for seat position. I know the Talon bar for this bike comes at the shortest 90mm and honestly, I would not want an 80mm. I worry that I am now sized out of what I felt was the perfect fit bike. If I had one adjustment on the 44 it would have been to be able to dial in the 100 stems… but on the 43 I am off the critical pedal power position.

    Noreen on

  • Ron,

    thanks for reaching out and checking out our writeup on the Dogma F. My take is that road cyclists have placed so much emphasis on ride quality because of the narrow tires people were using. Now that the best bikes have really honed in on how much they want the rider to feel, the addendum of wider 28mm tires on wide rims (like the 353 NSW) takes even more of the edge off chip seal and poor roads. 

    Alvin - Contender Bicycles on

  • I am considering a Dogma F end of 2022 or spring 2023 to replace my Madone SLR. I appreciate the ride quality of the Madone, especially on a Century ride. My thought is if I run ZIPP 353 NSW w/ 28mm tubeless @ 60’ish PSI (I am 172#), won’t the wheels/tires mitigate the “harsh” Pinarello ride on everything but the worst pavement?

    Thoughts?

    Ron Feigen on

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